BOBBY CHARLES : ALLIGATORS, SPROCKETS AND BENDED KNEES

1938-2010

louisiana's forgotten genius

Selected Songs - 25 Tracks -

Cover Bobby Charles - Aligators Sprocket

CD One

01. Later Alligator
02. On Bended Knee
03. Hey Good Lookin'
04. Why Did You Leave
05. Don't You Know I Love You
06. Watch It Sprocket
07. Time Will Tell
08. Take It Easy, Greasy
09. Ain't Got No Home
10. Laura Lee
11. No Use Knocking
12. LonelyStreet
13. Mr Moon
14. I'm aFool to Care
15. Over Yonder
16. I'll Turn Square for You
17. Put Your Arms Around Me Honey
18. Why Can't You
19. No More (IAin't Gonna Do It)
20. You Can SuitYourself
21. One Eyed Jack
22. Yea Yea Baby (Yeah Yeah)
23. Good Lovin'
24. Your Picture

 

CD Two

01. Since She's Gone
02. At the Jamboree
03. Since I Lost You
04. Oh! Yeah
05. What Can I Do
06. The Town Is Talking
07. Bye Bye Baby
08. Those Eyes
09. WhataParty
10. I Just Want You
11. Four Winds
12. NothingAs Sweet As You
13. Teenagers
14. Tell Me Baby
15. I'd Like to Know
16. Lovesick Blues

Bonus Material:

17. Bill Haley & the Comets - See You Later Alligator
18. Fats Domino - Before I Grow Too Old
19. John Fred - Good Lovin'
20. Fats Domino - Walking to New Orleans
21. Clarence 'Frogman' Henry - But I Do
22. Fats Domino - It Keeps Raining
23. Clarence 'Frogman' Henry -  On Bended Knees
24. Johnnie Allan &the Krazy Kats - Your Picture

 

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Bill Halley & The Comets

"See Yoy Later Alligator" - 1956

Fats Domino

"Walking To New Orleans" - 1960

 

John Fred

"Good Lovin' - 1960

Clarence "Frogman" Henry 

(I Don't Know Why) But I Do" - 1960

PREVIOUS ALBUMS (No Compilations)

"Down South In New Orleans"

"Down South In New Orleans" was the last song that Bobby Charles performed on stage, it was on November 25, 1976 at the Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco, at The Band's farewell concert. The song was included in the triple album that remembered the event, but was the only artist who participated in the concert that Scorsese did not include in the movie The Last Waltz. Robert Charles Guidry should be considered among the great Louisiana composers, perhaps hiding behind his introverted personality, rock'n'roll pioneer and musical ideologist of the swamp rhyth'n'blues. Bill Halley, Fats Domino or Clarence Henry got hits with his songs, but were only a sample of Bobby Charles's ability to compose, between 1955 and 1957 he recorded seven singles for Chess in Chicago and for the next two years, six more singles for Imperial Records, being more than thirty the total number of 45's recorded throughout his career. His first album by his own did not appear until 1972, although since then his musical journey was another story.

02/14/2020

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